My strange, deeply unhealthy obsession with Cartoon Network’s ADVENTURE Time yeilded a bunch of pieces this year.

Here they are in chronological order, more or less.

This is actually from Dec.27 of last year, but eh, it’s still close — I talk with Ryan North about the KaBOOM! AT comic book.

Courtesy of Andrew Neal

Here’s an intro to the series on the eve of the comic book’s launch party at Chapel Hill Comics, who did an original cover.

Before Season Four premiered, I did an interview with series creator Pendleton Ward with guest-Qs by Paul Pope, Mike Allred, Joe Hill — and this original Tony Millionaire illustration of Lumpy Space Princess!

Here’s the conclusion to that Pen Ward interview, with guest-appearances by Scott McCloud, Scott Kurtz, and this special original illo by Tony Millionarire’s daughters Phoebe and Pearl!

I interviewed some of the people who worked on the show about their own comic book projects — here’s a talk I did with Tom Herpich, who did the above “Thank You,” along with “Goliad,” “Memory of a Memory” and “Too Young,” among many others.  This is about his new comic WHITE CLAY.

Here’s a piece I did with Micahel DeForge, who’s designed props and things for such episdoes as “Beautopia” (seen above).  This is about his online strip ANT COMIC and his print collection LOSE.

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Here’s another interview I did with Pen Ward, about the influence of 1980s culture on his work.

Lev Grossman

Later, I talked with THE MAGICIANS novelist Lev Grossman (and his daughter Lily) about our obsession with ADVENTURE TIME.

And on a slight AT-tangent, I talked with A SOFTER WORLD writer Joey Comeau on the BRAVEST WARRIORS comic book from KaBoom!, based on Pen Ward’s new YouTube series.

Marceline's Dad (Adventure Time) by James Harren Comic Art

Finally, I got many, many new additions to my collection of ADVENTURE TIME drawings by comic book artists.  There is some pretty cool stuff in there, including things by guys who work on the show.

Yes, I’m aware I have a problem.  I’m working on it.

Hey guys — just had a great week subbing again for Whitney Matheson at Pop Candy!  Here’s all the posts I did in once easy-to-find place, day by day!

Monday:

zack smith drive

Early Buzz!

Alison Bechdel

Special Guest Essay by the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund’s Charles Brownstein!

kirk hammett metallica

Gift Suggestions from Mondo’s Justin Ishmael, The Four Horsemen, and Mark Rein of Epic Games (GEARS OF WAR!)

Tuesday:

Boy Meets World

Early Buzz!

Sopranos

TV Critic Alan Sepinwall talks his new book THE REVOLUTION WAS TELEVISED, which talks with the stars and creators of THE SOPRANOS, LOST and more!

Hulk Beats the Devil

CARTER BEATS THE DEVIL and SUNNYSIDE author Glen David Gold discusses the thrills and perils of collecting original comic book art!

Wednesday:

Special Super-Sized Early Buzz (Nearly 50 Items!) with a special guest-logo by teen cartoonist Emma Capps!

hornet

“How to Write a Comic Book” — I team up with Chris Roberson (Monkeybrain Comics, MASKS, MEMORIAL) to show would-be writers the resources that can help them!

Lev Grossman


“Two Grown Men and a Seven-Year-Old Discuss ADVENTURE TIME:” THE MAGICIANS author and TIME magazine writer Lev Grossman (and his daughter Lily) chat with me about our obsession with Cartoon Network’s hit show!

Thursday:

KFC

Early Buzz with EXCLUSIVE News about some bizarre-sounding KFC cookies!

scrooge

Turner Classic Movies’ Robert Osborne chats with me about his favorite holiday films!

northend

My friend Chris Shy chats about his new graphic novel THE NORTH END OF THE WORLD, about the famed photographer of Native Americans, Edward Curtis — and his own journey to tribal lands to research the book!

Friday:

Early Buzz: A 'Regular Show' Exclusive

Last Early Buzz — with an exclusive preview clip of Cartoon Network’s REGULAR SHOW and a special award for SHERLOCK’s Benedict Cumberbatch!

Dean Haspiel

Emmy-Winning Cartoonist Dean Haspiel talks his Trip City comics salon and his efforts at Hurricane Sandy relief!

Alamo Draft House: Summer of 1982

And finally — I talk with people from the Alamo Drafthouse and the Carolina Theatre of Durham about our favorite years in film!

From The Independent Weekly

Stitches: A Memoir
By David Small
W.W. Norton & Company; 329 pp.

The second graphic novel to be nominated for the National Book Award, David Small’s memoir of an unhappy childhood is the best David Lynch film David Lynch never made.

Using negative space, chiaroscuro and well-chosen slashes of gray, Small captures the perspective of his younger self, surrounded by towering, monstrous adults who literally gave him cancer, leaving him unable to speak for years. The sequences aren’t told so much as they are presented as lucid dreams, reflecting the fear, confusion and defiance of a child who doesn’t completely understand the world.

Small, principally known as a Caldecott-winning illustrator, makes a stunning debut into adult works with a book that’s the equivalent of a good therapy session—one that leads to a joyous catharsis as young David finally receives the comfort and understanding he so badly needs. In theory, it might not sound like a feel-good story, but in practice it’s one of the most uplifting works of the year. —Zack Smith


Goth Girl Rising
By Barry Lyga
Houghton Mifflin Books for Children; 350 pp.

Many authors write about the high school years they wish they had; Barry Lyga writes about high school as most people actually remember it. Like the late John Hughes, he sets all his stories at the same small-town high school, but where Hughes emphasized comedy, Lyga focuses on the hell that is the teenage mind—filled with insecurity, guilt and an attitude that combines self-hatred with hatred for everything else.

Goth Girl Rising is the sequel to the first book in this sequence, The Astonishing Adventures of Fanboy and Goth Girl, where the comic book fan of the title entered into a potentially dangerous friendship with Kyra Sellers, the Goth girl. Now back from a stay in the hospital, Kyra resumes her life of shocking people, stealing cars and arguing with her widowed father, while half-heartedly plotting an ineffective “revenge” against Fanboy, whom she sees as abandoning her.

Filled with topical details (Kyra spills out her insides in blank verse and unsent letters to author Neil Gaiman), Lyga writes teens so real that you wish you could tell them they just need to let go of their anger and bitterness. Luckily, they’re usually smart enough to figure this out for themselves. —Zack Smith


The Magicians
By Lev Grossman
Viking Adult; 416 pp.

Lev Grossman knows science fiction and fantasy. As a book reviewer for Time, he’s heavily promoted the idea that we live in a world where “the geeks have won.” But the geeks don’t exactly win in The Magicians, a look at the fantasies of childhood from an adult perspective.

The first part takes a group of teens through a school for magic, where the friendships and couplings play just as big a role as spells and potions. In the second half, they find themselves adrift after graduation, only to retreat into a Narnia-esque fantasy world where quests and dungeons don’t solve neuroses and insecurities.

The fantasy detail is as fun as the relationship material is insightful, and The Magicians offers a lesson for those who graduate from Harry Potter and its ilk: Fantasy can help you escape reality, but only you can escape your own faults. Now someone just needs to teach Twilight fans a similar lesson. —Zack Smith

Juliet, Naked
By Nick Hornby
Riverhead Hardcover; 416 pp.

Nick Hornby’s already having a great year with his successful screenplay adaptation of Lynn Barber’s An Education, and he continues his streak with his latest novel, Juliet, Naked.

Combining the themes of music-obsessed males from High Fidelitywith the female protagonists of his more recent work, Juliet concerns a college professor obsessed with a reclusive singer-songwriter, the long-suffering girlfriend who dares to pen a negative review about his new disc of unreleased acoustic (“naked”) tracks, and the singer-songwriter himself, who likes this review and begins a correspondence with the girlfriend.

Though Hornby has fun satirizing obsessive fans and Internet culture, the book’s themes deal more heavily with the redemptive power of self-expression—whether it’s breaking out of a lifetime’s rut or being reminded that there’s still potential within you. And it’s also terribly funny. —Zack Smith

The MAGIC of Lev Grossman, Part Three

By Zack Smith

 Our three-part talk with The Magicians author Lev Grossman concludes with a look at the future of comics, the experience of surviving Comic-Con, a literary debt to Larry Niven, and what fans might see in a sequel to his book.

Read the full interview here!

The MAGIC of Lev Grossman, Part Two

By Zack Smith

 Our three-part talk with Lev Grossman (part one can be read here), author of The Magicians continues today. In this installment, we discuss the evolution of comics, how The Magicians may or may not have its roots in fanfic, influences on the book, and much more.

Read the full interview here!

The MAGIC of Lev Grossman, Part One

By Zack Smith

Quentin did a magic trick. Nobody noticed.

Lev Grossman’s third novel, The Magicians has hit the bestseller list and earned rave reviews since its release in late August. It’s the tale of Quentin Coldwater, a young, smart fan of a series of fantasy novels about a realm called Fillory, which he longs to escape to.

But Quentin gets the next best thing when he finds himself accepted to Brakebeaks, a school of magic where he not only learns incredible secrets, but also finds the love and friendship he’s been looking for. After school, though, Quentin and friends find themselves without direction…until they gain the opportunity to access a mystic realm, with terrible secrets they may not escape.

Read Part One of our in-depth interview with author Lev Grossman here!

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