October 2007


Monster Creature Feature

BY ZACK SMITH


In days of television past, children often tuned in to the creepy hosts who introduced old monster movies on the local channels. But as cable television took over and movie broadcast rights grew more expensive, the classic television personality gave way to self-mocking characters such as Elvira and Joe Bob Briggs before vanishing into memory.

In Raleigh, at least, the old-school monster movie host is alive and well in the form of Craig Vance, aka Ormun Grimsby, of Monster Creature Feature on RTN 10. The series splits old monster movies into two-hour-long installments, ranging from silent classics (The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari) to more recent classics (Night of the Living Dead) to outright camp (Santa Claus Conquers the Martians).

Full interview here.

Juliette & the Licks
Life on the small stage

BY ZACK SMITH


Juliette Lewis made her name as an actress in the 1990s working with high-profile directors like Martin Scorsese and Oliver Stone in Cape Fear and Natural Born Killers. In the last few years, though, she’s reinvented herself as a rock ‘n’ roll singer.

Full interview here.

GUGGENHEIM TALKS RESURRECTION


by Zack Smith

Imagine that one day, aliens invaded Earth. Nicknamed “The Bugs,” they easily beat back our military forces. For 10 years, our world lived under their occupation.

Then, one day, they just left.

Now, in the aftermath of an alien invasion, a disparate group of characters are faced with one enormous question:

What’s next?

That’s the premise for Resurrection, a new ongoing creator-owned series premiering from Oni Press this November. Written by Marc Guggenheim (Wolverine, The Flash) and illustrated by Dave Dumeer, it’s a tale that answers the question – what would really happen after an alien invasion? To get an idea of what this new world will face, we chatted with Guggenheim about his new series, and also got some hints at what’s coming up in his other comic projects.

Full interview here.

AFTER THE ARRIVAL: TALKING TO SHAUN TAN


by Zack SmithAustralian illustrator Shaun Tan’s sixth book, The Arrival, has recently made a big splash on American shores. The 128-page hardcover, telling the story of a migrant’s journey to a surreal-but-familiar new world, has already earned awards and international acclaim for its cinematic visuals and universal story, with cartoonists ranging from Art Spiegelman to Jeff Smith to Marjane Satrapi providing rave reviews on the back cover of the American edition.Full Interview here.
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The life neurotic
Darjeeling gets personal, while Ryan Gosling finds his own little miss sunshine

BY NEIL MORRIS and ZACK SMITH



Ryan Gosling goes for the spare in Lars and the Real Girl.
Photo by George Kraychyk/ Sidney Kimmel Entertainment

Lars and the Real Girl might be this fall’s Little Miss Sunshine, which you can take as either an endorsement or a warning.

Like Sunshine, Lars takes deep, psychological dysfunction—in this case, a lonely man’s delusional acceptance of a “love doll” as real—and uses it as the backdrop for sitcom laughs and heartwarming sentiment.

Full review here.

TALKING TO JUNOT DIAZ, II – COMIC WRITERS AND WRITERS WRITING COMICS


by Zack Smith

Neswarama: Junot, you mentioned several current books you enjoy – what are some others you read? It sounds like you have a pretty extensive monthly catalog.

Junot Díaz: I read as much as I can – I love the form.

Every now and then, a new Red Star issue arrives – I’m like, “Yahoo!” Powers is always hot. And I’ve got to admit, I’ve got an ill weakness – this will probably reveal me as the dumbass I am – I’ve always had an ill weakness for Fantastic Four. And I’ve always, always, always had a weakness for Captain Marvel and Green Lantern. So the whole new Sinestro Corps stuff is….I love that crap. You gotta love that stuff.

Full interview here.

TALKING TO JUNOT DIAZ
by Zack SmithThe most acclaimed literary novel of the fall opens with a quote from…Galactus?Welcome to The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz.  It’s a novel that chronicles the life, times and family of Oscar de León, an overweight comics fan from a Dominican family growing up in the 1980s.  We conducucted an in-depth talk with this acclaimed writer on the influence of comics on his novel. 

 

 You can read the first of the two-part interview here.

NOTE: Link Fixed

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